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Down Syndrome Guild of Greater Kansas City

5960 Dearborn Street Ste. 100
Mission, KS 66202
913-384-4848 Phone
913-384-4949 Fax
info@kcdsg.org

Social Development

The social functioning of babies and children with Down syndrome is relatively less delayed than other areas of development. Babies with Down syndrome look at faces and smile only a week or two later than other children and they are usually sociable infants. Infants with Down syndrome enjoy communicating and make good use of non-verbal skills including babbling and gesture in social situations.

Most children and adults with Down syndrome continue to develop good social skills and appropriate social behaviour, though a significant minority may develop difficult behaviours, particularly those with the greatest delays in speech and language development.

Read more at Social development for individuals with Down syndrome - An overview

Friendships and Dating

Download a booklet all about friendships, dating and relationships to help teach your child or student and keep them safe.

Resources

Peer Supports

 

 

MOTOR SKILL DEVELOPMENT


The term motor development covers a wide range of important human skills, from sitting, walking and running, to independent drinking, eating and dressing, to writing, drawing and using a keyboard, to sports and dance, and to work related skills such as operating machinery or packing. Most of us take our motor skills for granted, as most are performed easily and effectively without the need for conscious control, but, in fact, all movements require fast and complex control by the central nervous system, and motor control is still not fully understood by researchers in this field. - Sue Buckley

Read more information about motor development HERE.

What is currently known about hypotonia, motor skill development, and physical activity in Down syndrome

The Role of Parents in Early Motor Intervention